4 years, 9 months ago

How MDD brings business relevance to the PaaS space

It seems that we have past the top of the hype around Platform-as-a-Service. A good moment to assess how serious the adoption of PaaS is in the enterprise. The different PaaS flavours It’s a while ago that I tried to structure and categorize the different cloud approaches to clarify the different types of “cloud” that we see in todays market.  I distinguished among 3 layers of Platform-as-a-Service (and some more layers that.

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6 years, 3 months ago

PaaS is lacking a vision on application development

Platform-as-a-Service (PaaS) is all about abstraction and automation. Abstracting away from underlying technology layers by automation. That’s basically what is happening on each layer of a cloud architecture, from hardware to IaaS, to foundational PaaS, to aPaaS. All this abstraction and automation is aimed at making application deployment a one-click or one-command experience for the developer. It makes deployment a self-service experience for the developer, which eliminates hand-offs and thus improves.

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7 years, 9 months ago

Designing the next programming language? Understand how people learn!

Somehow it is a recurring theme in computer science: create a “programming” system that is easier to use and learn than the existing programming approaches. I am not just talking about better tools, like IDEs, but also new languages. It seems as if each self-respecting programmer creates his/her own language or tool-set nowadays, right? Okay, I have to admit that not all efforts are focused on making things easier, often.

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8 years, 5 months ago

7 ways a Platform can fuel the App Economy

Earlier this year a Technet sponsored study showed that in February there were roughly 466,000 jobs in the “App Economy” in the United States. This so-called App Economy had zero jobs just 5 years ago, before the iPhone was introduced. The term “App Economy” isn’t formally defined but is often used to refer to the economy that has been created due to the development and delivery of software applications for.

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