1 month, 29 days ago

Enterprise Architecture and Agile do muddy the waters of Digital Transformation

In “Architecture is Dying – Why EA and Agile isn’t enough to stop Shadow IT”, Barry O’Reilly writes for IASA, “an association for all IT architects”, that “architecture is dying”…
Barry expects though a backlash for saying this “horr…

2 months, 17 days ago

Enterprise Architecture and Lean Thinking: Part One

Prior to joining Gartner, I was an Enterprise Architect practitioner for a Fortune 100 enterprise that embraced Lean Thinking. The principles of driving both business-outcome driven EA and holistic technology implementations across value streams was something I got really good at. I found joy in enterprise programs that came with big hairy audacious goals (BHAG) for […]

The post Enterprise Architecture and Lean Thinking: Part One appeared first on James McGovern.

3 months, 23 days ago

Emergence: Babies and Bathwater, Plans and Planning

  “Emergent” is a word that I run into from time to time. When I do run into it, I’m reminded of an exchange from the movie Gallipoli: Archy Hamilton: I’ll see you when I see you. Frank Dunne: Yeah. Not if I see you first. The reason for my ambivalent relationship with the word […]

4 months, 8 days ago

Do One Thing and Do It Well

By The Open Group One significant example of “fake news” in 2016 was the announcement that Dennis Ritchie, one of the original authors of the UNIX® Operating System, had passed away. In fact, he’d done so in 2011, a week after the death … Continue reading

5 months, 6 days ago

Form Follows Function on SPaMCast 426

One of the benefits of being a regular on Tom Cagley’s Software Process and Measurement (SPaMCast) podcast is getting to take part in the year-end round table (episode 426). Jeremy Berriault, Steve Tendon, Jon M. Quigley and I joined Tom for a discussion of: Whether software quality would be a focus of IT in 2017 […]

1 year, 4 months ago

Going Beyond Defined Agile Methods

I’ve been spending nearly half my time in Philadelphia over the past while, and I just happened to have a spare Saturday yesterday, so I hightailed it downtown. I had two objectives – to explore the Museum of Art and to attend a Brahms concert by the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. One of the featured exhibitions in the adjacent Perelman Building caught my eye. It’s named, Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design. I wasn’t sure what to expect; I certainly hadn’t heard of Bruce Mau before, but I am always interested in design and design methods.

The gallery is essentially laid out to be controversial, to challenge one’s status quo thinking. In a video, Mau says, “practically everything that we do is being designed or redesigned; if you think about the way that we live now our life from womb to tomb is a design experience. If we want a great life experience you have to design it.” Mau goes on to say his work is focused on allowing people who aren’t designers to have access to the power of design, in their life, their work, in their business. Giving people the tools to design their future in a highly positive way.

Almost at the door of the gallery is a huge exhibit detailing his “incomplete manifesto for growth”. And the manifesto principles look like a superset of the Agile development manifesto, but writ large, with vastly greater ambition. First there are 43 principles. What! I say to myself, how can that many principles be useful? But of course once you start reading you are hooked. The Agile principles are embedded, but there’s much more. Let me give you a taster:

1. Allow events to change you. You have to  be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it.

5. Go deep. The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value.

8. Drift. Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.

9. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.

13. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.

16. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.

20. Be careful to take risks. Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.

22. Make your own tools. Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference.

29. Think with your mind. Forget technology. Creativity is not device–dependent.

31. Don’t borrow money. Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.

39. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms. Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces—what Dr. Seuss calls “the waiting place.”

41. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.

These are just a sample. You get the idea. This is Agile for the real world. For those people that are stuck in the zone of religious adherence to Agile development methods this may be anathema. But it’s a wakeup call. Invent your own.

The complete list and much more . . .

Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design
November 21, 2015 – April 3, 2016

AFTERWORD: I wonder to what extent these principles map to a variety of design disciplines? In fact surely all design disciplines are creative processes. Would this include musical composition? I see no reason why not.

1 year, 4 months ago

Going Beyond Defined Agile Methods

I’ve been spending nearly half my time in Philadelphia over the past while, and I just happened to have a spare Saturday yesterday, so I hightailed it downtown. I had two objectives – to explore the Museum of Art and to attend a Brahms concert by the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra. One of the featured exhibitions in the adjacent Perelman Building caught my eye. It’s named, Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design. I wasn’t sure what to expect; I certainly hadn’t heard of Bruce Mau before, but I am always interested in design and design methods.

The gallery is essentially laid out to be controversial, to challenge one’s status quo thinking. In a video, Mau says, “practically everything that we do is being designed or redesigned; if you think about the way that we live now our life from womb to tomb is a design experience. If we want a great life experience you have to design it.” Mau goes on to say his work is focused on allowing people who aren’t designers to have access to the power of design, in their life, their work, in their business. Giving people the tools to design their future in a highly positive way.

Almost at the door of the gallery is a huge exhibit detailing his “incomplete manifesto for growth”. And the manifesto principles look like a superset of the Agile development manifesto, but writ large, with vastly greater ambition. First there are 43 principles. What! I say to myself, how can that many principles be useful? But of course once you start reading you are hooked. The Agile principles are embedded, but there’s much more. Let me give you a taster:

1. Allow events to change you. You have to  be willing to grow. Growth is different from something that happens to you. You produce it.

5. Go deep. The deeper you go the more likely you will discover something of value.

8. Drift. Allow yourself to wander aimlessly. Explore adjacencies. Lack judgment. Postpone criticism.

9. Begin anywhere. John Cage tells us that not knowing where to begin is a common form of paralysis. His advice: begin anywhere.

13. Slow down. Desynchronize from standard time frames and surprising opportunities may present themselves.

16. Collaborate. The space between people working together is filled with conflict, friction, strife, exhilaration, delight, and vast creative potential.

20. Be careful to take risks. Time is genetic. Today is the child of yesterday and the parent of tomorrow. The work you produce today will create your future.

22. Make your own tools. Hybridize your tools in order to build unique things. Even simple tools that are your own can yield entirely new avenues of exploration. Remember, tools amplify our capacities, so even a small tool can make a big difference.

29. Think with your mind. Forget technology. Creativity is not device–dependent.

31. Don’t borrow money. Once again, Frank Gehry’s advice. By maintaining financial control, we maintain creative control. It’s not exactly rocket science, but it’s surprising how hard it is to maintain this discipline, and how many have failed.

39. Coffee breaks, cab rides, green rooms. Real growth often happens outside of where we intend it to, in the interstitial spaces—what Dr. Seuss calls “the waiting place.”

41. Laugh. People visiting the studio often comment on how much we laugh. Since I’ve become aware of this, I use it as a barometer of how comfortably we are expressing ourselves.

These are just a sample. You get the idea. This is Agile for the real world. For those people that are stuck in the zone of religious adherence to Agile development methods this may be anathema. But it’s a wakeup call. Invent your own.

The complete list and much more . . .

Work on What You Love: Bruce Mau Rethinking Design
November 21, 2015 – April 3, 2016

AFTERWORD: I wonder to what extent these principles map to a variety of design disciplines? In fact surely all design disciplines are creative processes. Would this include musical composition? I see no reason why not.

1 year, 4 months ago

The UNIX® Based Cloud

By Harry Foxwell, PhD, Principal Consultant, Oracle® Oracle® Solaris continues to evolve as the foundation for critical private cloud implementations.  As the premier UNIX®  system in the IT industry, certified against The Open Group exacting standards for enterprise-level operating systems, … Continue reading