3 years, 10 months ago

The Entity Card

Whatever business you are in, information is the most important raw material there is and it should be understood by many. Using tools like the entity card is one way of communicating on relatively stable information structures, there are other ways. People may say this is hard and takes a lot of time todo. To them […]

3 years, 10 months ago

The Entity Card

Whatever business you are in, information is the most important raw material there is and it should be understood by many. Using tools like the entity card is one way of communicating on relatively stable information structures, there are other ways. People may say this is hard and takes a lot of time todo. To them […]

4 years, 5 days ago

You May Not Need A CDO — But Wouldn’t You Want To Improve Your Odds Of Success?

Jennifer Belissent and I just published a report on the role of the Chief Data Officer that we’re hearing so much about these days Top Performers Appoint Chief Data Officers. To introduce the report, we sat down with our press team at Forrester to talk about the findings and about the implications for our clients.

Forrester PR: There’s a ton of fantastic data in the report around the CDO. If you had to call out the most surprising finding, what would top your list?

Gene: No question, it’s the high correlation between high-performing companies and those with CDOs. Jennifer and I both feel that strong data capabilities are critical for organizations today and that the data agenda is quite complex and in need of strong leadership. That all means that it’s quite logical to expect a correlation between strong data leadership and company performance — but given the relative newness of the CDO role, it was surprising to see firm performance so closely linked to the role.

Of course, you can’t infer cause and effect from correlation — the data could mean that execs in high-performing companies think having a CDO role is a good idea as much as it could mean CDOs are materially contributing to high performance. Either way, that single statistic should make one take a serious look at the role in organizations without clear data leadership.

And you’re right, there’s a ton of fantastic data in this report; the next most surprising finding is just the rapid adoption of the role. Forty-five percent of organizations globally is a lot, and this was a particularly broad-based survey, with more than 3,000 respondents.

Read more

4 years, 5 months ago

All Data as a Service (DaaS/BDaaS) – Who’s Your D-a-a-S Enabler?

There are three primary and distinct roles to consider, whether
you’re building or buying DaaS – regardless of the type or
characteristics of data that’s being exchanged; big data, open data,
fast data, IoT/IoE data, metadata, microdata, multimedia content,
structured, non-structured, semi-structured…ALL DATA.

The DaaS Consumer – who needs not only to acquire data from
somewhere (in a way that shields them from the underlying technology
concerns), but also then may use it to develop information apps and
services, or repackage the data to share further with others.  The
consumer assigns and realizes value from the service.

The DaaS Provider – who actually builds, markets and
operates the business service and categorized storefront (or catalog),
and brokers or stewards the data quality & availability, data
rights, licenses and usage agreements between the consumers and the
original data owners.  The provider creates, shapes and deploys the
opportunities for value-enablement of specific data assets.

IT Services Management  – who design, implement and operate
the information and data management infrastructure the DaaS Provider
relies upon – and manage the IT component and services portfolio this
infrastructure includes. For example the databases, virtualization
technologies, data access services, storage and middleware capabilities.
(Note that “IT Services Management” may be a wholly 3rd-party role, as
well as a role within the DaaS Consumer or Provider organizations –
there may be 3 or more IT Services Management domains).

There’s also a less distinct, more broadly relevant role – the DaaS Enabler.
a.k.a. the “Enterprise Architect”, which can be a person, a role, or an
organizational capability. The EA scope includes a heavy focus on
enterprise “universal” information management and governance, infused
(particularly in the Public Sector) with the currently vogue
philosophies of SOA, Open Data, Mobility, Privacy-by-Design (PbD)
and Cloud Computing. (Note that DaaS does not have to be delivered via a
“cloud” deployment model – it’s equally-applicable delivered as a
private data services virtualization platform, for example).

4 years, 5 months ago

All Data as a Service (DaaS/BDaaS) – Who’s Your D-a-a-S Enabler?

That’s where we’re headed, inexorably – you’d like to know what’s going on with your systems, what your customers or constituents need, or perhaps the latest metrics concerning device utilization trends during business events. And, you’d like this information (all of it, or lots of it) right now, in an easily consumable, visual, semantically-relevant way – to share with your community and to be automatically (or easily) ingested by your other systems or analysis tools. Secure & compliant, fast, portable, standardized if necessary, high quality.

But most of all, you’d like to pay only for the data and the way it’s delivered to you – not for a bunch of information technology products and services, hardware and software. You want data-as-a-service, as a consumer; i.e. explicit data units delivered via affordable service units. (Note the service deployment method might include Database-as-a-Service, i.e. DBaaS).

Or – you’re on the other side – you want to actually build the DaaS capability, to offer DaaS (or, perhaps a better term is a “Data Sharing Service” ) to your constituents or customers – as a provider.

There are three primary and distinct roles to consider, whether you’re building or buying DaaS – regardless of the type or characteristics of data that’s being exchanged; big data, open data, fast data, IoT/IoE data, metadata, microdata, multimedia content, structured, non-structured, semi-structured…ALL DATA.

  • The DaaS Consumer – who needs not only to acquire data from somewhere (in a way that shields them from the underlying technology concerns), but also then may use it to develop information apps and services, or repackage the data to share further with others.  The consumer assigns and realizes value from the service.
  • The DaaS Provider – who actually builds, markets and operates the business service and categorized storefront (or catalog), and brokers or stewards the data quality & availability, data rights, licenses and usage agreements between the consumers and the original data owners.  The provider creates, shapes and deploys the opportunities for value-enablement of specific data assets.
  • IT Services Management  – who design, implement and operate the information and data management infrastructure the DaaS Provider relies upon – and manage the IT component and services portfolio this infrastructure includes. For example the databases, virtualization technologies, data access services, storage and middleware capabilities. (Note that “IT Services Management” may be a wholly 3rd-party role, as well as a role within the DaaS Consumer or Provider organizations – there may be 3 or more IT Services Management domains).

There’s also a less distinct, more broadly relevant role – the DaaS Enabler. a.k.a. the “Enterprise Architect”, which can be a person, a role, or an organizational capability. The EA scope includes a heavy focus on enterprise “universal” information management and governance, infused (particularly in the Public Sector) with the currently vogue philosophies of SOA, Open Data, Mobility, Privacy-by-Design (PbD) and Cloud Computing. (Note that DaaS does not have to be delivered via a “cloud” deployment model – it’s equally-applicable delivered as a private data services virtualization platform, for example).

Information management includes the entire lifecycle of “information as an asset” capabilities in an enterprise, and into the stakeholder ecosystem – from the data sources, their ingest and “staging/data quality”, to storage in various repositories and access via information & data services, user interfaces and ultimately information-sharing and digital engagement services.  (See more of Oracle’s “Enterprise Information Architecture” ).

The DaaS Enabler (as a person) might be known by other titles, like Chief Data Officer, Chief Information Officer, DaaS Architect, Information Architect – maybe even Chief Innovation Officer (focusing on data assets); regardless of the title, the experience and scope of attention is as mentioned above, coordinated across all three service roles.  EA skills are essential, because DaaS enablement includes people, processes, technology and information concerns.

Each service role (Consumer, Provider, IT Management) benefits from the DaaS Enabler, particularly given the fact that the maximum value to be realized by each role’s investment in effort and resources – is collaboratively dependent on the others, and dependent on acknowledgement of proven, trusted, pragmatic enterprise architecture principles.

Oracle is an example of a DaaS Provider  – empowering businesses and public sector organizations (i.e. DaaS Consumers) to “use data as a standalone asset and connect with partner data to make smarter decisions. Oracle DaaS is a service in Oracle Cloud that offers the most variety, scale, and connectivity in the industry, including cross-channel, cross-device, and known and anonymous data.” 

Oracle is also a DaaS Enabler – as an organizational capability, for DaaS Consumers, Providers and IT Services Management.  This includes people (Enterprise Architects, supporting organizations and communities), processes (DaaS engineering, deployment and operations models, case studies, tools and business services), technology (DaaS information and device technologies, tools and platforms, hardware and software) and information (data assets, reference architectures, knowledge capital).

Creating or using Data-as-a-Service (DaaS), Big Data-as-a-Service (BDaaS), or any other DaaS initiative, exposed to the public or entirely within your enterprise?  Identify your DaaS Enabler(s).

4 years, 9 months ago

Do you perform Information Architecture or a Data Architecture?

So, full disclosure, I care about Wikipedia.  Call me dumb, I know.  Wikipedia has been described, alternatively, as the best platform ever invented for fostering useless arguments among ignorant people /and/ the most successful encyclopedia effort of all time.  The truth, as always, lies between these extremes. Well, I’m part of a small team that…

5 years, 26 days ago

Get Your Enterprise Architects Plugged Into Your Big Data Initiatives

This week I released some more research on enterprise architecture. But this time it’s a bit different than what you usually see. For this research I wanted to focus on how EA helps enable impactful initiatives. So to kick that off I chose to publish best practices on Big Data. See the link below: Best […]

The post Get Your Enterprise Architects Plugged Into Your Big Data Initiatives appeared first on Mike J Walker.

5 years, 26 days ago

Get Your Enterprise Architects Plugged Into Your Big Data Initiatives

This week I released some more research on enterprise architecture. But this time it’s a bit different than what you usually see. For this research I wanted to focus on how EA helps enable impactful initiatives. So to kick that off I chose to publish best practices on Big Data. See the link below: Best […]

The post Get Your Enterprise Architects Plugged Into Your Big Data Initiatives appeared first on Mike J Walker.

5 years, 1 month ago

The State of Enterprise Information Architecture

In my opinion, the importance of Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) cannot be overemphasized. We are in an information driven world, full stop. This becomes even more clear as we look into the future of technology. As you can see from the Gartner 2014 strategic technologies list (http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2603623), many if not most are all predicated on […]

The post The State of Enterprise Information Architecture appeared first on Mike J Walker.

5 years, 1 month ago

The State of Enterprise Information Architecture

In my opinion, the importance of Enterprise Information Architecture (EIA) cannot be overemphasized. We are in an information driven world, full stop. This becomes even more clear as we look into the future of technology. As you can see from the Gartner 2014 strategic technologies list (http://www.gartner.com/newsroom/id/2603623), many if not most are all predicated on […]

The post The State of Enterprise Information Architecture appeared first on Mike J Walker.

5 years, 1 month ago

Being Forgotten in the Internet of Things

We all know that Google lost a landmark legal case recently.  As of now, a citizen of Europe has the “right to be forgotten” on the Internet.  As of now, a citizen of Europe can ask Google to “forget” them, so that a search of their identity will not return embarrassing information from the past.  This allows a person to live past a mistake.  Your college indiscretion, and that time you were fired for photocopying your butt, or the time you got drunk and drove your car into a swamp and had to be rescued… all of that can “go away.”

However, this becomes much more difficult when we consider the emerging Internet of Things (IoT).  In the Internet of Things, the “stuff” that you own can generate streams of data that do not remain within your control.  That data is called “Information Property.”  It is the information that YOU generate, in the things that you do.  I believe that if YOU create a bit of information property, you should own it.

That information property, thousands of tiny bits of data about you or your activities, will wander out of your house, or your car, or your phone, to companies and governments running cloud-based data centers.  That swarm of data surrounds you, and be used to profile you, track you, predict your actions, influence your choices, and limit your abilities to get “outside” the system.  Most folks will not have any problem with this cloud of data.  At least not at first. 

Where we will first feel the pain of this cloud of data: when you want to be forgotten.

A parallel that does work

We have been dealing with “data about you” for a while.  When you apply for a loan or a credit card, the information you submit becomes the property of your creditor, and they share that data with credit reporting agencies, along with your payment history, employment history, residential history, status of property ownership, and basically any other factor that finance companies feel would influence your likelihood to pay your debts.  The US Federal Government has placed some controls on this data, but not many.  Europe has placed entirely different controls.  You have no right to be forgotten, but you do have the right to limit their memory to a decade.  That allows you to “get past” a mistake or series of mistakes.  But you are always “known.”  However, a mistake can be forgotten. 

This is a model we can use.  Here is data, about you, outside your control, that get’s “forgotten” on a regular basis as it gets old.  There is a possibility in the credit reporting world for being “forgotten” because the data is tied to you, personally.  It is ALL personal data. 

This is not (yet) true in the Internet of Things.  If your car sends data to a smart roadway system, there is a great deal of information about where you go, and when, but under most circumstances, your identity is not tied to that data.  It’s the identity of the CAR that is sent, but not the identity of the driver or passenger.  That can be seen as an advantage, because it is tough to link that data to you, but it is possible, and therefore it will occur.  You will be found.  And when it does occur, you no longer have any easy mechanism to PROVE that the data from your car relates to you. This means that if any government creates a policy to allow you to be forgotten, the car data will not go away.  You can’t CLAIM that data because it is not directly linked to you.  You don’t own it.

Think this is a minor problem?  After all, your city doesn’t have a smart roadway yet, and your car doesn’t send data, so this problem is a long way off, right?  Wrong.  If we don’t think of this now, privacy will be sacrificed, possibly for decades. 

The environment of regulations sets the platform by which companies create their business models.  If we create a world where you cannot claim your data, and you cannot manage your data, other people will start claiming your data, and making money.  Once that happens, new regulations amount to government “taking money” from a company.  The typical government response is to “grandfather” existing practices (or to protect them outright).  No chance to change beyond a snail’s pace at that time.

A proposal

I propose a simple mechanism.  Every time you purchase a device on the IoT, you insert an ID into the device.  This ID is a globally unique ID (my tech friends call this a GUID) which is essentially a very large random number.  You can pick up as many as you want over your lifetime, but I’d suggest getting a new one every month.  A simple app can create the GUID and manage them.  Every item you purchase during that month gets the ID for that month.

Every bit of data (or Information property) sent by the device to the swarm of companies that will collect and work with this data will get your GUID.

Note that your GUID allows those companies to link your data across devices (your phone, your car, your refrigerator, your ATM card, your medical record, etc).  Is this allowed?  Perhaps one government or another will say “no” but that control will be easily worked around, so let’s assume that you cannot control this.  The thing I want to point out is that this kind of linkage is POSSIBLE now, it’s just more difficult.  But difficulty is being overcome at a huge rate with the number of computing devices growing geometrically.  Let’s assume that folks can do this NOW and that you will NEVER be able to control it.

Therefore inserting an ID is not giving up control.  You don’t have it now.

But it is possible, with the ID, to TAKE control.  You will be able to submit a request to a regulated data management company (a category that doesn’t yet exist, but it is possible), then those systems can identify all the data records with your ID, and delete them.  Only if you can claim your data can you delete it.  By inserting a GUID into your Internet-of-things, you have gained a right… the right to claim your data, and therefore delete it.

It will no longer be a choice of sending a single message to a single search firm like Google.  The request to delete will have to go to a broker that will distribute the request, over time, to a swarm of data management companies, to remove data tagged with these IDs. 

Some implications

Now, before anyone complains that a company, once they have data, will never let it go, I would submit that is nonsense.  90% of the value of information comes from samples of that data of less than 2% of the population.  In fact, the vast majority of data will be useless, and plenty of companies will be looking for excuses to toss data into the virtual trash bin.  If a customer asks to delete data, it costs a micro-cent to do it, but that data is probably clogging things up anyway. 

Getting a company to spend the money will probably require regulations from large players like the EU, the USA, China, Japan, Brazil, and India. 

The time to act is now

Now is the time to ask for these regulations, as the Internet of Things is just getting started.  Companies that understand the ability to create and manage these IDs, and respond to the request to delete information, will have a leg up on their competition.  Customers will trust these companies more, and the data will be more accurate for consumers of these data services. 

You cannot delete “information property” until you can claim it.  The ID is the claim.