13 years, 7 months ago

Implementing Effective Governance

Link: http://www.biske.com/blog/?p=808

According to ZDNet’s Joe McKendrick’s coverage of the recent Gartner Application Architecture, Development, and Integration summit, SOA governance and siloed thinking is top of mind.

If this really is the case, how do we make our governance efforts more effective? The more I think about this, the more I come back to a recent post of mine from earlier this year: “Want Successful Enterprise Architecture? Define ‘Enterprise’ First.” I’m convinced that this is a critical step for any effort that tries to go beyond a project-level scope, SOA initiatives included. If you don’t provide a structure that says what things will be implemented and managed at an enterprise level, versus a domain level or project/team level, anything with the term “enterprise” will be a struggle.

Too often, the approach to governance is concerned with establishing oversight, not establishing outcomes that are rooted in an agreed upon definition of what will be managed at an enterprise level, a domain level, and at the project level. Does it really help to set a standard that a particular coding library must be used when there is no central team that manages the library, no centralized support team, and no stated strategy for developer portability across projects? No, it just gets people up in arms and accusations of EA or the governance team being an ivory tower that sets arbitrary standards.

In my book, I defined governance as the combination of people, policies, and processes that are put in place to ensure the organization achieves one or more desired behaviors and outcomes. It’s not there to simply have a check mark to that says, “I went through a review.” In the absence of clear desired behaviors and outcomes, that’s what you will have. There is no reason to have an enterprise architecture team review a project if there are no things that are managed (or desired to be managed) at an enterprise level. You need to have some idea of what those things are up front, along with a mechanism for quickly making decisions on new candidates for enterprise items. The project team must know that this analysis will be done, and that it is a necessary part of achieving the company’s strategic goals, which they should be well aware of. Lack of communication of these goals can be just as detrimental and is often a symptom of lack of agreement on enterprise goals or inadequately specified goals: “Sure, we need to cut our IT costs by sharing more systems. I’m all for it as long as they’re not mine.” Someone needs to define exactly what the target areas are.

To be successful, we must define the desired outcome first. We must clearly establish the list of things that must be managed at an enterprise level, a divisional level, or left to the discretion of individual projects/teams. In fact, it’s even more fundamental than this. We can’t even know what success is without doing this step. There were no shortage of companies in the past that stated they were adopting SOA, my question to them would be, “How do you know when you’ve been successful?” Simply having a bunch of services doesn’t mean you’ve adopted SOA, it has to be the right services. Too often, enterprise architecture teams are positioned for failure because this fundamental step has not happened. Before you task your enterprise architecture team with reviewing all projects, make sure you’ve defined what enterprise is. If you haven’t, task your enterprise architecture team with doing the analysis of what’s out there and coming up with some recommendations. Then, your governance program will actually have a desired outcome to use in their reviews.

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